Ward8From1948EsquireGuide2Certain cocktails have a very clear history – we know who first mixed them, where they were first created, and even how they have changed over time.  Not all of them, however. The stories tell us that the Ward Eight was invented in Boston to honor Martin Lomasney of the West End. That’s the legend. The truth is a bit more complicated, but no less intoxicating. In an upcoming talk at the West End Museum, Stephanie Schorow, author of Drinking Boston: A History of the City and Its Spirits, unravels the political skullduggery and drinking habits and customs of the late 19th Century that set the stage for the creation of this cocktail and how its invention fits into the cultural and political landscape of the city.

Join Schorow at the West End Museum at 6:30 PM at the West End Museum on Saturday, March 23. Tickets are $5 for members and $10 for non-members. Pre-registration is required.

In Drinking Boston, Schorow serves up a remarkable cocktail representative of Boston’s intoxicating story: its spirit of invention, its hardscrabble politics, its mythology, and the city’s never-ending battle between personal freedom and civic reform—all told through the lens of the bottom of a cocktail glass. Schorow introduces readers to the cast of characters who championed or vilified drinking and the places where they imbibed—legally and otherwise. Bringing us to present day, this literary pub-crawl visits some of Boston’s most beloved and enduring neighborhood watering holes, ending with an examination of Boston’s very own recipe for the current cocktail renaissance sweeping the nation.

Schorow is the author of six books on Boston history, including Boston on Fire: A History of Fires and Firefighting in Boston, The Cocoanut Grove Fire, The Crime of the Century: How the Brinks Robbers Stole Millions and the Hearts of Boston, among others. A seasoned reporter, she has worked for the Boston Herald and the Associated Press.

Drinking Boston at the bar